cape fear

Jul 31

I had a patient in the clinic who really did not want an abortion but who had no resources to cover the costs of prenatal care or childbirth. She was single and without insurance coverage but made just enough money to be ineligible for state assistance. She already had outstanding bills at the hospital and with the local ob-gyn practice. No doctor would see her without payment up front.

We were willing to do the abortion for a reduced rate or for free if necessary. But she really didn’t want an abortion. Once I understood her situation, I went to the phone and called the local ‘crisis pregnancy center.’

"Hello, this is Dr. Wicklund."

Dead silence. I might as well have said I was Satan.

"Hello?" I said again. "This is Dr. Wicklund."

"Hello," very tentatively, followed by another long silence.

"I need help with a patient," I said. She came to me for an abortion, but really doesn’t want one. What she really needs is someone to do her prenatal care and birth for free."

"What do you expect us to do?"

I let that hang for a minute.

” —

This Common Secret, Susan Wicklund

Crisis Pregnancy Centers often disguise themselves as medical facilities, with advertisements offering “help” with an unplanned pregnancy. Their main goal is to keep the pregnant person from having an abortion at all costs. Usually, all they’ll give you is a free pregnancy test, some baby clothes, and maybe a box of diapers.

The patient referred to in the quote was given free prenatal care and did not have to pay the financial cost of childbirth by a local anti-choice doctor. She would often stop by Dr. Wicklund’s office to let her know how she was doing:

"He (the doctor) always moans and groans about being tricked into [doing this]," she says. "Then he goes off on these tirades against abortion."

(via provoice)

"This Common Secret" is such a phenomenal book. And yeah, crisis pregnancy centers are generally evil, so there’s that.

(via thebicker)

And there you have it.

(via foulmouthedliberty)

(via denimfordinner)

(Source: beautynursedondarkness, via blacksanctuary)

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monicalewinsky1996:

marshmallowknight:

if ur only supportive of disabled people when their weight is in an “acceptable” range, then ur not actually supportive of disabled people and also i hate u

*AIRHORN*

(Source: transyoite)

(Source: trynsave, via es-juckt)

Anonymous said: What do you think of girls who call their boyfriends daddy?

theworldisa:

i hope that my girlfriends never called my dad. like, what would they talk about? no girls that i dated were into ACDC.
- derrick


Ty & Hat Part 2

Ty & Hat Part 2

(Source: 120-percent-rad, via tedwassanasong)

Let’s raise children who wont have to recover from their childhoods

(Source: renaissancedreams, via eatmethefuckoutbasically)

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Jul 30

“It’s why we launched in Dollar Tree recently. My dad needs to be able to buy this mayo and not even think about whether it is healthy or affordable. Food should be healthier and more affordable for regular people or it won’t even mean anything.” — Hampton Creek CEO Josh Tetrick • Discussing why his company chose to introduce its plant-based mayonnaise Just Mayo—which relies on food science to match its egg-based equivalent as closely as possible—to Dollar Tree, a store that sells most of its items for just $1 each. Tetrick’s approach here, inspired by his dad’s own choice to shop at Dollar Tree, is unlike most veggie food companies; he says that’s important, because his goal is ultimately to bring his vegan food substitutes to the mass market. (via titotito)

(Source: shortformblog, via amateur-astronomer)

[video]

[video]

oddbagel:

Fruit Goth is the new Aesthetic. It’s a mixture of Seapunk and Witch house. Goths and vampires in Hawaiin t-shirts dance the night away to fruity synth pop on an deserted beach on a deserted island.

(Source: oddbagel, via foxxxynegrodamus)